Unpredictable comedy

On+Nov.+30%2C+Comedy+Sports+members+Hector+Gonzalez%2C10%2C+Javier+Navarro%2C12%2C+Justina+Clark%2C12%2C+and+Jonathon+Larson%2C12%2C+come+together+to+create+a+skit+about+pie+in+the+theater+to+show+students+their+love+for+humor.+%E2%80%9CThe+strongest+factor+is+definitely+the+lifelong+bonds+all+the+players+create+with+each+other+in+order+to+be+comfortable+on+stage+with+one+another%2C%E2%80%9D+Narvarro+said.+%E2%80%9CIn+Comedy+Sports%2C+we+are+family.%E2%80%9D+

Mileena Sosa

On Nov. 30, Comedy Sports members Hector Gonzalez,10, Javier Navarro,12, Justina Clark,12, and Jonathon Larson,12, come together to create a skit about pie in the theater to show students their love for humor. “The strongest factor is definitely the lifelong bonds all the players create with each other in order to be comfortable on stage with one another,” Narvarro said. “In Comedy Sports, we are family.”

Brenda Lopez, Writer

The Comedy Sportz High School League presented their second performance of the year on Nov. 28, as seniors Justina Clarkrose and Jonathan Larson and sophomore Hector Gonzalez took on their first game with a crowd full of laughter and joy. Captain and manager, Javier Nevarro,12, began by announcing some last minute changes. Because Paramount High, the school they were originally supposed to play, couldn’t make it they were forced to play each other, so it was now Downey vs. Newbies. Nevarro picked his strongest players and was sure they would make the best out of their performance. Newbies were sure to not disappoint their captain as well as the audience, taking the winning score 34-32.

 

“I’m very happy I got to play because originally first year players don’t play until second semester,” Clarkrose said. “I’m definitely more nervous for getting the brown bag [given when a player says something offensive or inappropriate] than performing in front of crowds.”

 

Before each game, all players meet in the drama room to go over the games and warm-up. David Neale, the team’s current referee, helped the new players through the process and gave them tips to make their first performance successful. Nevarro also contributed to making their first appearance comfortable, but most importantly, fun and exciting by being part of their team; this gave the novice team a boost of confidence.

 

“I think my captain and team-mates prepared me well enough,” Gonzalez said. “My first performance was definitely a good one.”

 

All the games are improvised and completely random, so getting up on stage is no easy ride. Players have to be ready to improvise at all times; this is what makes their performances so unique to watch. These shows are half based on their audience and the other half on the performers; the audience is just as important as the players. Former member of Comedy Sportz, Randell Milan explains that in order for people to know what it’s about, because one can’t really explain it, people have to see for themselves. He also explained the importance of the contribution of the audience itself.

 

“The audience controls the show,” Milan said. “So when you go to see the show you don’t go to see the show; you’re now part of it.”

 

One of the audience’s all-time favorite games was Forward and Reverse. This game consists of the audience picking the setting and then the players making up a scene. The scene began with Valerie Chavez,11, talking to Oriana Harter,11, hoping to find love in New York City. Then comes Bryce Caliwag,12, very upset that his past lover left him and so he hopes to also find love. Chavez and Caliwag meet and instantly fall in love. Right at the time when Chavez was planning the wedding Caliwag’s past lover Marco Arroyo ,11, comes in and stops them. Caliwag jumps of joy and hugged him. Arroyo then explained he left to the liquor store to get some wine for their honeymoon. The scene ended with Caliwag and Arroyo running off overjoyed to have each other. Constant yelling of “reverse” or “forward” at random times made the scene humorous, not to mention the plot. At any time, the referee can yell out, “forward” or “reverse.” If he yells “reverse,” the scene begins to go backwards, but if he yells “forward,” the scene will just continue on forward. This forces the audience to laugh and anticipate what might happen next or before in the scene.

 

“I really liked the Forward and Reverse game because it was very random and funny,” Ivan Zuniga,12, said. “You wouldn’t expect half of the things they say or act out.”

 

All in all Nevarro was sure to organize a well put together performance. This club usually holds one game per month and some student audience members have even thought about joining the following year. Once students go and see what it’s all about, they’re sure to come back for more.