The Downey Legend

Largest Single Group of Migrants Dig a Tunnel to Their Future

Nicole Alvarez, Writer

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Tucson, Arizona – The largest single group of migrants were reported crossing the U.S. border by digging tunnels under the border wall. 376 people were arrested on Jan. 18; 176 of those migrants were children and 30 out of those 176 were unaccompanied or without a parent or guardian. In order to take care of everyone’s paperwork, the Yuma Border Control had to call in workers from other areas.  

 

With President Donald J. Trump’s concern with ending illegal immigration with a wall at the southern border, there is no question that people in Mexico are scared.

 

Every brick that makes up that wall is another person who does not get a chance of a better life. Another child that grows up without an education. Another mother that cannot feed her family. Another father who, as much as he works, cannot provide for his family.

 

These groups of migrants are a representation of how no wall, no matter how strong or high, will stop families from fighting for a chance.

 

Downey High School wide diversity of people has created a multicultural environment. Immigration isn’t just an issue for adults. Children from all different ages have had to migrate with their parents in order to get better education. Affected communities include Downey with students such as Downey High sophomore Nikolai Rayaba populating school sites across the city.

 

Rayaba was born in Cebu, Philippines where he has his fondest childhood memories but lacked opportunities, due to the corrupt government. He shares that he is very grateful for his chance at a better life since coming to the U.S but wishes that people would not be so soon to judge.

 

“Some things that I wish that people know [knew] is that we worked hard to get here” Rayaba stated. “and they can’t just treat us differently because we’re not from America.”

 

Everyone deserves a chance whether it’s in the U.S. or elsewhere. Instead of creating a wall symbolizing separation and hate lets build a bridge of opportunities for people who want them the most.

About the Writer
Nicole Alvarez, Writer

With the rhythm of a dancer in her heart, Nicole Alvarez, 10, a Cuban-American, credits her heritage with her taste in music, love for dance and her favorite food, her grandmother’s arroz amarillo.  “My life is strongly influenced by my Cuban culture.” Alvarez said.

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Largest Single Group of Migrants Dig a Tunnel to Their Future